Writing

What’s your story

Permission Slips

I’m sharing this post with permission from a Story Circle Network writer friend; I loved it and think you will, too.

Posted on by Jude Walsh Whelley

 

permissionJude

Every Sunday I meet with my tribe of four women writers for a morning of what Eric Maisel calls Deep Writing. It is a lovely, centering time where we sit side-by-side and write. During occasional breaks, we share information on craft, submission, and building platform. The shared writing energy keeps us focused and productive. On my drive home, as I process what I wrote and what we shared, I am frequently inspired. At those moments, I use the voice memo function on my phone to record my thoughts. I may listen to that voice memo and transfer it to written form immediately or, if life grabs me when I get home, the memo may sit for a while.

In a recent burst of decluttering energy, I decided to review the waiting memos. I found this gem and want to share. I was looking for ways to honor my muse and prioritize time for writing. These are the permission slips I wrote for myself. Perhaps you might like to take a few moments and write some permission slips of your own?

I give myself permission to do what I love

I give myself permission and encouragement to pursue my writing dreams

I give myself permission to devote time to my writing first

I give myself permission to buy the things I need to help me accomplish my goals

I give myself permission to say no to favors or meeting someone else’s needs that distract me from my purpose

I give myself permission to do this without guilt

I give myself permission to write my truth without concern for how it makes anyone else feel because it is my truth, my writing, my story, and no one is going to keep me from speaking my truth.

I give myself permission to put myself first

Jude Walsh Whelley writes fiction, memoir, and poetry. She lives in Dayton, Ohio. This post was previously published on her blog, Writing Now

Categories: creatiity, creative writing, energy, essay, finding yourself, growth, Learning, personal stories, reflections, Story Circles, Writing | 3 Comments

Racism in 1953

It was 1953, in Hampton Virginia, where we had just moved from Erie, Pennsylvania. My dad had been recalled into the Air force for the Korean Conflict. His “Greeting” letter from Uncle Sam had been a shock. We had to leave our newly remodeled house behind and move to Virginia to be with him.

I was on the city bus riding home from my high school in Newport News. A young man, a college student, arms loaded with books boarded the bus paid his fare and grabbed on to the nearest railing.

The bus pulled out into traffic. “Move to the back of the bus,” the driver snarled. The black student ignored him. “I said now, move to the back of the bus,” he repeated.

“No sir,” the student replied. “I am getting off in a few blocks.”

I watched in amazement. I had heard about the civil rights movement but had never encountered such an incident. I silently cheered for the young man. The driver’s face got redder as his anger rose. He jammed on the brakes and pulled into a fire station. Two burly firemen came out to see what was going on; when the irate driver told them, they boarded the bus and physically threw the student out the door.

I was so shocked that for a moment I didn’t know what to do. Then I got my whit’s about me, opened my notebook and recorded the driver’s name and ID number from the front of the bus and the number of the fire station, then described the event on my paper in a few words. My knees were shaking as I went to each passenger on the bus and asked them to sign my petition. Most passengers, about 20 of the 30 on board signed it.

I really didn’t know what to do with the petition itself … at home over dinner I told my parent what had happened. They praised me and encouraged me to do something with the petition. I took it to school and my English teacher persuaded me to write an article and send it along with the petition to the bus company.

I did. Sad to say nothing ever came of it, no response or explanation ever came.

To this day, I haven’t forgotten the young man and his humiliating experience. As a young person, I became aware that discrimination is insidious and we all must monitor our feelings and actions toward others. Because of it I became a champion of the underdog.

Categories: creative writing, essay, memoir, personal stories, reflections, stories, Writing | Tags: , , | 8 Comments

Story Circle “Table Stories”

Hi Writers,

Last reminder to send me your “Table Story”, if you haven’t already done so. Karen Lopez and Dianne Persall are anxiously awaiting their fabulous tasks of putting together our book. So far the design is top secret. Any one who has attended a Story Circle class or workshop is eligible to submit their Table Story to me at –  jangolden3@gmail.com

Check the November 24th post here if you need a reminder about the topic. 

An essay contest is to be announced January 15 by the library, winners to be showcased at the celebration February 20th.

A Library Lovers Month Celebration will be then be held at the Library February 20, at 6:30 pm. This will be a speaking opportunity for the Library Director, Friends of the Library representative, Jan Golden, and the winning writers to share a part of their works. (This is where we can present/sell/or giveaway our book!)

The Library is inviting local author’s to set up tables so they may share their works as this kind of event has been requested by patrons interested in the local authors. It will give our local authors a way to showcase and share their literary accomplishments with our patrons in national library lover’s month. The Friends of the Library might also set up a table with a small selection of especially nice gift books to further their good cause.

I’m excited. Our book will show the Safety Harbor Library how much we appreciate their support of writers over the last 3 years, and how much progress we have made in our writing. 

Categories: creative writing, finding yourself, memoir, personal stories, Story Circles, Writing | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

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